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So you get a very real visceral kind of jealousy that has to do with sexual competition as well as professional competition. Navigate your way through Dash, Bitcoin and smart contracts January 18, Dash is up and Bitcoin is down. Therefore, we hold that the plaintiffs and others similarly situated for whom the actions have been brought are, by reason of the segregation complained of, deprived of the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment. As faculty, staff and students at Arizona State University discovered, the answer is: Brookes pointed to Venezuela's proximity to U. Today it is a principal instrument in awakening the child to cultural values, in preparing him for later professional training, and in helping him to adjust normally to his environment.

Remembering Roky Erickson, a Forefather of Outsider Rock

Sowing seeds and growing connections to end hunger in Maricopa County March 5, Sometimes experiential learning means getting your hands dirty. That was the first lesson some Arizona State University students learned Feb. The pros and cons of AI March 5, Science fiction books and movies have largely formed the public's worldview of artificial intelligence, often clouding the truth on where we stand with the technology.

Many are under the Project Humanities conference helps men to open up to each other March 4, Harvey Weinstein. Kevin Spacey. Bill Cosby. Rob Porter. Sexual harrassment and assault are all over the news these days, and many men want to understand more about what we all can do to Digital-age tools and technology give rise to fake videos March 1, About the only thing more dangerous than a fake news story is a fake news video.

Drafting history in black and white February 28, In , year-old Claudette Colvin refused to give up her Montgomery, Alabama, bus seat to a white passenger and was arrested. Nine months More and more, Americans care about remnants of the past among us, When aging goes wrong: As many as 1. Policymakers say Arizona should 'guide the narrative' on blockchain February 21, Republican Rep.

David S. Schweikert of Arizona said Wednesday that the state should lead the country when it comes to developing regulation on blockchain applications and businesses and fully Khayelitsha, a slum in Cape Town, South ASU-led donation drive delivers much-needed supplies to schools in Puerto Rico February 20, How do you get 1, school supplies from Arizona to an island nearly 3, miles away?

As faculty, staff and students at Arizona State University discovered, the answer is: Connecting with an offline world February 19, The internet. We use it every day, all day, and barely think about it. Change everything, all at once February 16, Chris Wharton sees the world very differently than you or me.

The associate professor of nutrition and interim director for the Eradicating poverty through energy innovation February 16, Access to energy is at the nexus of many social problems, and improving the ability of people to gain access to affordable, reliable energy could help mitigate the effects of poverty and a But eating healthier Origins Project Dialogue to discuss the nuclear threat February 13, In an international environment which some observers have argued is as dangerous as at any time during the Cold War, what do advances in modern warfare mean for national and international security Free-speech discussion at ASU highlights universities' responsibility to the pursuit of truth February 12, As recently as January of this year, yet another college was in an uproar over a controversial speaker when University of Chicago students, faculty and alumni demanded the school rescind its The Sustainability Consortium gives retailers tools for responsible products February 1, Most people have heard of blood diamonds.

In the early s, diamond January Why is this year's flu season so bad? Immune systems have been strained, emergency rooms jammed, and cough The result has been twofold: Cycle of changes: How about each year? The answers to these questions have never been quantifiable, but that's about to The relationship between religion and politics is fraught but necessary January 29, Jan.

Since then, politicians, pundits and citizens of all stripes have watched as America became a nation more deeply The crisis, which has placed ASU Law marks successful first decade of graduating Master of Legal Studies students January 23, A law school is filled with aspiring lawyers for whom the institution serves an obvious purpose. ASU support-group sessions benefit psychology students, university community January 22, In June , The Beatles released a song that would go on to be covered more than 50 times, no doubt because it proclaimed a universally appealing truism: Navigate your way through Dash, Bitcoin and smart contracts January 18, Dash is up and Bitcoin is down.

IBM and Microsoft have That address turns out to be fake and police end up at a Safety first: A human-centered approach to brain implant design January 17, The complex network of signals in the human brain make us capable of amazing athletic feats and innovative ideas, but Bachelor's degree vs. The move sparked ASU developing biodegradable plastics made from bacteria January 9, The world is awash in discarded plastics.

It is also the reason why all multicellular life is susceptible to cancer. The processes of evolution are the fuel behind the interplay of ASU interns serve enticing digital experiences for Starbucks customers January 8, For a team of 10 Arizona State University computer science and software engineering students, a Starbucks technology internship means considerably more than becoming a connoisseur of coffee — Get ready for a great year!

Early flu cases rise sharply in Arizona January 5, The spread of influenza across the U. This season started Food for thought: One important Resetting yourself for better mental health December 28, Social networking sites have dominated our culture and the way people spend their time. We are constantly plugged in, checking the news, our feed, stories and snaps.

Generation Z, or the Looking at war, technology and identity from a moral perspective December 27, Brad Allenby has collaborated on various endeavors to comprehend the broad societal impacts of our use of powerful new technologies as military weaponry. Now he has a role in an effort to probe A growing number of airlines, including American, For Drazek, Arizona State ASU research offers hydropower dam energy solution without sacrificing Mekong food supply December 7, The Mekong River is an economic engine for fishermen and a food source for millions of people worldwide.

Easy egg sandwiches for nutritious brain food December 7, Editor's Note: This is the third installment in an ASU Now series featuring nutritious recipes demonstrated by faculty from the The beans put nitrogen back into the soil, the corn grew a stalk that the beans used as a ASU student teams dive into tricky problem of school funding in Arizona December 6, Education funding in Arizona is one of the most complex, controversial and political issues facing the state.

But a group of Arizona State University students eagerly jumped into this debate Community-based care saves lives December 5, Doctors have myriad life-saving technologies at their fingertips, but they can all be rendered useless without human warmth and community connection. ASU music student taps ancient tradition to create preventive health regime for musicians December 4, Brianne Borden, DMA graduate student in music performance, has experienced firsthand the rigors of pursuing a career as a professional musician — from debilitating performance anxiety to Navigating toxic relationships December 1, While Thanksgiving has passed, the holiday season remains in full swing with many more family get-togethers approaching.

In the recent article " ASU freshmen showcase original solutions to real-world health problems December 1, Hundreds of Arizona State University students crowded the courtyard between the Health North and South buildings Friday afternoon in downtown Phoenix. November Solar fishing lights: ASU alum bolsters Native American health research in nation's capital November 29, Native Americans have distinct health-care needs.

And now they have a new leader in health research who aspires to usher tribal nations across the country into a new era of medical discovery ASU prof shows effectiveness of federal school-meal plan November 22, In Congress passed the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, allowing the USDA to make critical nutrition reforms to school-lunch and -breakfast programs for the first time in more than 30 years.

The carbon catcher: And he thinks you should be, too. The concern of the Arizona State University professor and founding director of the Tips for surviving family table talk this Thanksgiving November 21, Thanksgiving brings us closer together, but our conversations across generations in a family can sometimes drive us farther apart. Real 'Mission Impossible': Thwarting hackers with individuals' biosignals November 20, At a cinema in the not-too-distant future ….

The deputy defense minister sprints down a street in Vienna.
Free porno tube interracial movies page His smart watch contains missile blueprints. Ethan Hunt rappels from a Shrinking of ozone hole suggests other large environmental problems can be solved, says ASU sustainability scientist November 20, For more than three decades, atmospheric scientists have been issuing warnings that carbon emissions and man-made pollution have punctured a hole in the ozone layer, the natural atmospheric layer Freshmen coming home for Thanksgiving: It may not be as easy as it seems November 19, This week, all across the country, freshman students will return home for the Thanksgiving holiday, many for their first extended stay with their families since they made the Mayo Clinic, ASU collaborate to seed and accelerate research November 17, In Silicon Valley, investors flock to back potentially disruptive new technology and apps — even if they are still in development.

But the funding landscape is a little different for health New ASU program helps professionals polish their skill set to boost career November 17, Professionals whose college days are behind them still need to learn new skills to stay at the top of their game, and Arizona State University has launched a new way to do that.

Fortunately, the former Back from the brink: Electrolyte drink recipes for staying hydrated November 13, Editor's Note: This is the second installment in an ASU Now series featuring nutritious recipes demonstrated by faculty from the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, an Can biology show us how to stop hackers? Would America benefit from a three-party political system?

November 6, Not since the s has the United States been so divided, largely split into two political camps. But what if a third major political party emerged in the U. Would it lead to more Samara Klar, a political scientist who studies electoral behavior I thought we ASU nursing alum creates online community to fight pediatric misinformation November 2, A passion for accurate and accessible medical information led Arizona State University College of Nursing and Health Innovation alumna Danielle Stringer to come up with a unique solution.

October Evolving the 'birds and the bees' talk: With the dramatic — and sometimes graphic — accounts of unwanted propositions getting increased public The opioid consumption turned crisis: However, the prescription bottles in Amid the kids exploring giant bubbles, a kiddie car wash, and a paint maze, there is an 8x4 folding table with a red tablecloth The velocity of change October 26, Fifteen years ago, Michael M.

Neither naysayers nor the Great ASU study: Communication is key for keeping your kids off drugs October 25, It might be a difficult conversation to have, but a new study confirms that talking to your children about substances ASU team turns smartphone into a powerful microscope in the fight against infectious diseases October 25, With smartphones millions of times more powerful than the NASA Apollo computers that sent us to the moon in the s, scientists have been eager to adapt them back here on Earth to better ASU professor explores MeToo phenomenon — and why some people might not join in October 25, A simple tweet by actress Alyssa Milano has recently become a cultural and viral phenomenon.

Aside from memory loss, caregivers can expect to encounter symptoms that ASU student spearheads lab-glove recycling program October 24, Bill Dauksher has worked in clean rooms and labs for almost 30 years. For him, putting on lab coats, booties, a face mask and gloves is like putting on pants for the rest of us. The manager ASU professor charts digital plan to fight domestic violence October 23, Fact: Almost 1 in 4 women and 1 in 7 men have experienced severe physical violence Judy Woodruff at ASU: Weinstein scandal creates dialogue on workplace harassment October 17, As the Harvey Weinstein scandal continues to dominate national headlines and new survivors come forward on a near daily basis, some believe the media attention on this case is a tipping point We drive to get to work some of us drive for work , we drive to meet with friends, we drive to get Life after breast cancer October 16, The American Cancer Society estimates that about , women in the United States will be diagnosed with breast cancer this year.

They will join the approximately 3. ASU Make a Difference Week highlights student, alumni service work October 13, Since Hurricane Maria struck Puerto Rico three weeks ago, 83 percent of the island is without power and 36 percent has no running water.

The humanitarian crisis there and the recovery efforts ASU professor's research on alcoholism, recovery brought to life in new documentary October 12, For the past 30 years, Linda Costigan Lederman, Arizona State University professor of human communication and director of the Hugh Downs School Opposing political parties find common ground at civil dialogue event October 12, Two former senators, a liberal Democrat and a conservative Republican, had a discussion at Arizona State University on Thursday about how civic discourse has disintegrated and how it can be ASU professor's bereavement program to roll out nationwide October 10, Death is a part of life.

For those people experiencing what the Immigration advocate says communities' values can guide reform October 9, A nationally recognized immigration advocate and author said Monday that reform is not insurmountable and that many communities across the nation are showing the way, but it'll take a cross-sector Five outstanding ASU students chosen to attend Mayo medical conference October 9, With government leaders still undecided on the subject of national health care and the fate of millions of Americans hanging in the balance, Mayo Clinic Center for Innovation held its annual At the same time, however, a far-right party, Alternative for Germany, gained a spot in Parliament for the first time in more Mayo Clinic, ASU researchers working on new tool to diagnose valley fever October 8, Infectious-disease researchers at Mayo Clinic and Arizona State University are working on a new test to detect valley fever more quickly and efficiently than currently available tests.

Spurning the typical narrative of scarcity, Future H2O ASU engineer stimulates brain function, research October 4, In recent years, transcranial electrical stimulation, or tES, has seen a surge in experimental applications. The noninvasive procedure employs electrodes placed on the scalp to direct a low Senate Subcommittee on Wednesday that massive data breaches like the recent Equifax hack, which exposed approximately Coping with trauma in the wake of a mass shooting October 3, Shock, sadness, fear, anger, confusion.

The waves Raising the bar with green buildings October 2, Buildings account for 46 percent of all carbon emissions. They also account for 75 percent of all electrical use. Those were the range of emotions Scott Somers experienced during his 21 days as a member of a Phoenix rescue team dispatched by the Federal Emergency Management What lies beneath Jupiter's clouds?

Engineer is working to help us see September 29, In the s and s, the Soviets put landers on the surface of Venus. One survived for 57 minutes the planned design life was 32 minutes in an environment with a temperature of degrees Climate change demands a change in transportation designs and materials, says ASU engineer September 28, Extreme summer heat has become more frequent across the contiguous U.

Finding fulfillment with how you fill your plate September 28, Sacrifice is a fact of life. We make sacrifices for our families, our work and even our diets. This Sunday, Oct. ASU engineers to aid national efforts to advance computing for and beyond September 26, Artificial intelligence is already here: You can buy a car today that warns against an unsafe lane change or slams on the breaks before you know you are in danger.

Disrupting diabetes and challenging convention September 22, The problem was simple but serious. Dana Lewis has type 1 diabetes and is a heavy sleeper, and the alarm on her continuous glucose monitoring CGM device that let her know her glucose The dangers of weaponized narratives September 21, Criticism of Facebook began last week after a news report said the social network enabled advertisers to seek out self-described anti-Semites and, revealed this week, published The ethics of advertising hate speech September 20, Facebook and Google have recently come under fire for allowing advertisers to target ads towards users who express an interest in hate speech or racist sentiments.

Facebook has also been ASU team takes cyberbullying app public September 20, Last December, as other teens were looking forward to the holiday season and planning outings with friends and family, Houston-area high school student Brandy Vela was feeling so overwhelmed by Is the US moving toward single-payer health care? September 19, Last week, Vermont Sen.

Swapna Reddy, clinical assistant professor ASU roboticists to develop smart ankle September 18, For the more than 2 million lower-limb amputees in the United States, the path less traveled is usually on sand or grass. Powered ankle prostheses enable Laid out on tables are drums of Lines may be long or short, equipment may be down and guidelines for screening passenger ASU lands grant to ensure first-generation success among engineering students September 13, Since , enrollment of first-generation college students in Arizona State University's Ira A.

Fulton Schools of Engineering has grown more than percent, bringing new ideas, perspectives and Floyd Abrams: Country desperately needs to be thinking about free speech September 12, Free speech, one of the most basic rights guaranteed to U. The road to evacuation: Escaping an unwelcome visit from Mother Nature September 11, Still packing powerful rains and winds, the remnants of Hurricane Irma continue to wreak havoc in cities along the Gulf Coast after a destructive journey through the Caribbean and Florida Helping distressed pets during disasters September 8, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma have displaced scores of humans, many of whom have equally frightened pets.

Although pets experience life differently than humans, there are things we have in common, When disaster strikes, health-care workers respond September 8, As superstorm Irma continues its destructive path and as residents in Texas and Louisiana grapple with the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey, health-care providers are responding to an onslaught of ASU engineer on rebuilding after a hurricane: First, sweep the porch September 7, When Tony Lamanna bought his home in New Orleans, the civil engineer discovered a hatchet in the attic.

The hatchet was stored there to chop an escape hole through the roof if the house flooded up Building resilient cities September 7, The flooding in Houston was exacerbated by how the city was built. Like many cities, Houston basically paved over the existing landscape, a grassy plain that evolved to handle large rainfalls by Are consumer data breaches the new normal?

September 7, On Sept. She got that and more. ASU researcher works to design algorithms for more robust networks September 1, Our daily lives depend on various networks — from the electric grid and transportation systems to online social connections — running reliably. At their most basic level, networks are a August Healthy Devils: This is the first installment in an occasional series featuring nutritious recipes demonstrated by faculty from the School of Nutrition and Health Promotion, an Play is an important part of creating an emotional What lives in floodwater?

August 28, Hurricane Harvey, still stalled in the Gulf Coast region, has poured more than 20 inches of rain over the Houston area since Aug. ASU Now spoke with Rigorous coursework. Sleep deprivation. Hunger pangs. Burgeoning romances. Such are the woes of college life, but they can create real, substantial problems for students Diamond electronics offer brilliant solutions August 10, Diamonds are among the most coveted objects in the world.

As gemstones, they are brilliant, rare and symbolic. If you think about ASU class empowers health-care professionals to end human trafficking August 10, A patient enters an examination room. She is young —14, maybe She is walking gingerly; wearing sneakers, baggy jeans and a sweatshirt — in degree weather.

A few steps behind her is It struck great fear Should scientists become gene genies? August 8, Scientists have for the first time edited genes in human embryos to fix a disease-causing mutation, according to a paper published ironically in the journal Nature. They used a new, cheap But a single vulnerability in Parents, teachers need to be creative in finding ways to interact August 4, As families send their children back into the classroom, these first weeks of the school year are a critical time for parents and teachers to create connections that will make it ASU prof hosts video contest to bolster science communication August 3, When scientists at Oregon Health and Science University announced Wednesday that they had successfully performed the first-ever gene editing of a human embryo to fix a mutation that causes a The Keto diet: Is eating more fat the key to weight loss?

The keto diet encourages eating more cheese, butter ASU engineer's lab partnering with US Army to improve Ebola detection August 1, To catch a serial killer, homicide detectives must quickly and accurately find clues. McGhee, a class valedictorian who had often visited Arizona, had dreamed of attending Arizona What does it take to evacuate a town?

July 19, Wildfires spout gouts of flame. Air tankers roar above treetops. Radios crackle, and the sun vanishes behind curtains of black smoke. All are stock images of fire season in the West. BRAIN center gathers to ponder future, direction July 19, For all its resiliency and creativity, the human brain is equally fragile and prone to disease. Millions around the world are affected by neurological and neurodegenerative diseases.

In fact, a Form follows function in materials design July 17, Suppose you want to build something — a skyscraper or a spacecraft, a computer or a car, a water bottle or a wristwatch. ASU engineer seeks to develop better plastics, faster July 17, Plastics are everywhere. Plastic polymer fibers can exceed high-strength Propane pro: Ariaratnam named to national committee studying safety of pipeline infrastructure July 10, Six million American households rely on propane gas to heat their homes and water, dry their clothes and barbeque their pork chops.

Farmers use propane to heat livestock housing and Embracing a fuller Latino history for a brighter future July 9, Update: Young Latinos need to embrace the history that has been New semiconductor material shows promise for more efficient power electronics July 6, Every year it seems like we have another device to charge — laptops, smartphones, tablets, wearable electronics, electric cars and so on.

Charging processes ubiquitously use power electronic How do microplastics affect the planet? July 3, As of July 1, , manufacturers must phase out plastic The flexible future of electronics July 3, Think your tech is cool? Wait until you see what Umit Ogras is working on. Along with five other universities, For those in positions that require a firm grasp Prudent use of resources — from Temperatures rising: Can we top degrees Fahrenheit?

ASU aviation chair on why the heat might affect your flight plans June 20, More than 40 flights in and out of Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport were canceled Tuesday afternoon because of record heat. Temperatures were expected to hit a record-busting Leveling up literacy June 13, One in five adults cannot read above a fifth-grade level, according to a study from the U.

Department of Education and the National Institute of Literacy. Nearly two-thirds of these adults did Calculating a love of math June 12, Do you like math? People tend to feel strongly one way or another, and likely your decision rides on your experiences in the classroom. ASU archivist makes Japanese Internment Camp Collection digitally accessible June 8, Uncomfortable as it may be, one way to avoid the mistakes of the past is to confront them — one of the reasons preservation of historical documents is so important, said Arizona State University Team launches initiative to develop viable market for waste carbon dioxide June 6, How do you create a way to take carbon out of the air and make money doing it?

One member of a team tasked with tackling it compared it Powerful silicon architectures in use today require rigidity, but the wearable, assistive and medical computing May Shadow hunting: ASU urban climatologist helps us keep our cool May 30, In an Arizona summer, the best parking spot is not the one by the door. Ariane Middel, Arizona State University urban Look closer at it.

ASU is among five university research Sustainable Phosphorus Alliance hosts first conference May 24, As agribusiness grows to feed an increasing global population, so do concerns about the sustainability of current agricultural practices. The use of phosphorus in big ASU engineer working to develop disposable point-of-care sensor May 18, As an electrical engineer, Associate Professor Jennifer Blain Christen has spent a good portion of her career dabbling in different fields.

Her enthusiasm for exploring new and different ASU's Arntzen on Ebola outbreak: ASU faculty, students work to combat misunderstandings between Arab, American cultures May 5, The United States is home to more than million people from dozens of countries and ancestries, in addition to Native American peoples.

Arab countries make up 22 nations in the Middle ASU poised to contribute May 4, Standing at the front of a large lecture hall as hundreds of college students streamed in with their books, bags and devices, headphones still in their ears, something dawned on William Heywood The team, But she is helping put up drawings, paintings and other items for display at April Todd Sandrin: ASU specialist: The U.

Supreme Court is expected to take up a redistricting case from Wisconsin where a voting rights group says the boundaries of the state Legislature were illegally drawn to give Republicans ASU Origins Project film screenings focus on climate April 20, The Origins Project at Arizona State University will screen two new climate-inspired films and then engage in conversations with leading filmmakers and leading climate experts on April 28 and 29, ASU on Earth Day: Uniting forces for common cause April 20, Over the past academic year, Kendon Jung noticed something about the 77 sustainability-related student groups he oversaw at ASU: Though they shared common goals, they were working separately to For years, the university struggled with theft, a lack of bike lanes and inadequate bicycle parking Pogo pack: ASU innovator creates wearable, trail tech — and we put it to the test April 14, There are two truths in backpacking: You will labor like a pack mule, and you will savor views most people never see.

As a backpacker, you love your gear. It keeps you comfy, healthy and Click here to read how one of Professor Tom Mayo Clinic-ASU program helps mothers in medical professions lower stress, beat burnout April 12, Mothers who work as health care professionals — such as physicians, physician assistants and nurse practitioners — can reduce their stress levels and burnout significantly by participating in User satisfaction: We also want all this high-capacity performance But is he really a good dog?

Public service scholarship helps ASU students make a difference March 24, Kelsey Wilson plans to make her mark in education. Not as a teacher, but as an advocate. She serves on the The experience ASU engineer helping develop brain implant to help the blind to see March 24, An Arizona State University neuroscientist is helping a private company develop a brain implant that will help the blind to see.

Intended for use by people without a retina — the largest Former Homeland Security chief speaks at ASU privacy-security forum March 21, Cybersecurity infiltrations and terrorist attacks have filled the headlines in recent months. These issues pose a significant threat to U. ASU, Conservation International team up to protect biodiversity March 20, Environmental news can be all too depressing, with headlines punctuated by the drumbeat of extinction and destruction.

There are occasional bright spots. One of them occurred this month when But despite our best efforts, cancer still eludes our Why is water cheaper than cable TV? ASU Professor ASU techies create 3-D model of mysterious, metal asteroid Psyche March 15, Exploring new worlds requires vision and some well-educated guesses; visual cues are nice, too. The asteroid Psyche is a new world that will be explored by a group of space scientists led by Exploring value of print in the digital age March 14, ASU professor Devoney Looser is leading a group of students through the stacks of Hayden Library, in search of old books that bear traces of the past.

The rise of low-cost geosensors is changing the field of geography ASU center helps Southwest manufacturers improve energy efficiency March 7, In business, a better bottom line means better profitability, competitiveness and overall success. For energy-intensive businesses in the manufacturing sector, improving energy efficiency can ASU research informs city of Phoenix on eco-friendly buying March 3, Arizona State University's School of Public Affairs is helping the city of Phoenix improve its impact on the environment by suggesting ways to make better eco-friendly purchasing decisions.

New ASU study shows that mentors matter March 1, Arizona State University has hit upon a new solution to help Native American men and boys overcome the host of obstacles that block the path to socioeconomic success for so many: Get outside the The waters have begun Nature or nurture?

Do you tell her to buck up, get dressed and send her to the bus stop, or do you tuck her back into bed and prepare some warm soup An associate professor in the School of Will we control artificial intelligence or will it control us? February 23, Like any new technology, artificial intelligence holds great promise to help humans shape their future, and it is also holds great danger in that it could eventually lead to the rise of machines Future Tense addresses cybersecurity in February stories, videos, interactives February 16, In an effort to help educate everyday people on the basics of cybersecurity, Future Tense is running a February Futurography package of articles, cheat sheets, videos and interactive quizzes ASU symposium examines cheating February 16, The guy at work who contributes squat to a team project.

The one who develops alligator arms every time the check arrives. For Valentine's Day: A look at how successful couples cope with stress February 13, Jason gets off work after a long, exhausting day. He drives home and ruminates about the way a coworker undermined him in front of their boss. He gets angry and stressed The power of writing to communicate knowledge February 10, A roomful of teachers are huddled in groups around pages of text, hurriedly highlighting, circling and underlining certain words and phrases.

New ASU program combines law, psychology February 9, Sometimes during a trial a lawyer will get angry, a witness will speak out of turn or a defendant will have an outburst. The judge will then calmly instruct the jury to disregard what just Rehab robotics field promises to return control, mobility to aging population February 7, For many seniors and stroke victims, a trip to Disneyland with the little ones is physically out of reach.

Countless microbial communities live everywhere from in the soil to human skin to the stomachs of animals. Surprisingly, despite the They had for more than a century before been regarded as beings of an inferior order and altogether unfit to associate with the white race, either in social or political relations; and so far inferior that they had no rights which the white man was bound to respect; and that the Negro might justly and lawfully be reduced to slavery for his benefit.

He was bought and sold and treated as an ordinary article of merchandise and traffic whenever a profit could be made by it. This opinion was at that time fixed and universal in the civilized portion of the white race. It was regarded as an axiom in morals as well as in politics, which no one thought of disputing, or supposed to be open to dispute; and men in every grade and position in society daily and habitually acted upon it in their private pursuits, as well as in matters of public concern, without doubting for a moment the correctness of this opinion.

The language of the Declaration of Independence is equally conclusive. It begins by declaring that. When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth the separate and equal station to which the laws of nature and nature"s God entitle them, a decent respect for the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident: The general words above quoted would seem to embrace the whole human family, and if they were used in a similar instrument at this day would be so understood. But it is too clear for dispute that the enslaved African race were not intended to be included and formed no part of the people who framed and adopted this Declaration; for if the language, as understood in that day, would embrace them, the conduct of the distinguished men who framed the Declaration of Independence would have been utterly and flagrantly inconsistent with the principles they asserted; and instead of the sympathy of mankind, to which they so confidently appealed, they would have deserved and received universal rebuke and reprobation.

Yet the men who framed this Declaration were great men—high in literary acquirements, high in their sense of honor and incapable of asserting principles inconsistent with those on which they were acting. They perfectly understood the meaning of the language they used and how it would be understood by others; and they knew that it would not in any part of the civilized world be supposed to embrace the Negro race, which, by common consent, had been excluded from civilized governments and the family of nations and doomed to slavery.

They spoke and acted according to the then established doctrines and principles and in the ordinary language of the day, and no one misunderstood them. The unhappy black race were separated from the white by indelible marks, and laws long before established, and were never thought of or spoken of except as property and when the claims of the owner or the profit of the trader were supposed to need protection.

This state of public opinion had undergone no change when the Constitution was adopted, as is equally evident from its provisions and language. The brief Preamble sets forth by whom it was formed, for what purposes, and for whose benefit and protection. It declares that it is formed by the people of the United States; that is to say, by those who were members of the different political communities in the several states; and its great object is declared to be to secure the blessings of liberty to themselves and their posterity.

It speaks in general terms of the people of the United States and of citizens of the several states when it is providing for the exercise of the powers granted or the privileges secured to the citizen. It does not define what description of persons are intended to be included under these terms, or who shall be regarded as a citizen and one of the people.

It uses them as terms so well understood that no further description or definition was necessary. But there are two clauses in the Constitution which point directly and specifically to the Negro race as a separate class of persons and show clearly that they were not regarded as a portion of the people or citizens of the government then formed.

One of these clauses reserves to each of the thirteen states the right to import slaves until the year , if it thinks proper. And the importation which it thus sanctions was unquestionably of persons of the race of which we are speaking, as the traffic in slaves in the United States had always been confined to them.

And by the other provision the states pledge themselves to each other to maintain the right of property of the master by delivering up to him any slave who may have escaped from his service and be found within their respective territories. By the first above mentioned clause, therefore, the right to purchase and hold this property is directly sanctioned and authorized for twenty years by the people who framed the Constitution.

And by the second, they pledge themselves to maintain and uphold the right of the master in the manner specified, as long as the government they then formed should endure. And these two provisions show, conclusively, that neither the description of persons therein referred to nor their descendants were embraced in any of the other provisions of the Constitution; for certainly these two clauses were not intended to confer on them or their posterity the blessings of liberty or any of the personal rights so carefully provided for the citizen.

Undoubtedly, a person may be a citizen, that is, a member of the community who form the sovereignty, although he exercises no share of the political power and is incapacitated from holding particular offices. Women and minors, who form a part of the political family, cannot vote; and when a property qualification is required to vote or hold a particular office, those who have not the necessary qualification cannot vote or hold the office, yet they are citizens.

So, too, a person may be entitled to vote by the law of the state who is not a citizen even of the state itself. And in some of the states of the Union foreigners not naturalized are allowed to vote. And the state may give the right to free Negroes and mulattoes, but that does not make them citizens of the state, and still less of the United States.

And the provision in the Constitution giving privileges and immunities in other states does not apply to them. Neither does it apply to a person who, being the citizen of a state, migrates to another state; for then he becomes subject to the laws of the state in which he lives and he is no longer a citizen of the state from which he removed.

And the state in which he resides may then, unquestionably, determine his status or condition and place him among the class of persons who are not recognized as citizens but belong to an inferior and subject race; and may deny him the privileges and immunities enjoyed by its citizens.

But so far as mere rights of person are concerned, the provision in question is confined to citizens of a state who are temporarily in another state without taking up their residence there. It gives them no political rights in the state as to voting or holding office, or in any other respect; for a citizen of one state has no right to participate in the government of another.

But if he ranks as a citizen in the state to which he belongs, within the meaning of the Constitution of the United States, then, whenever he goes into another state, the Constitution clothes him, as to the rights of person, with all the privileges and immunities which belong to citizens of the state.

And if persons of the African race are citizens of a state, and of the United States, they would be entitled to all of these privileges and immunities in every state, and the state could not restrict them; for they would hold these privileges and immunities under the paramount authority of the federal government, and its courts would be bound to maintain and enforce them, the Constitution and laws of the state to the contrary notwithstanding.

And if the states could limit or restrict them, or place the party in an inferior grade, this clause of the Constitution would be unmeaning and could have no operation; and would give no rights to the citizen when in another state. He would have none but what the state itself chose to allow him.

This is evidently not the construction or meaning of the clause in question. It guarantees rights to the citizen, and the state cannot withhold them. And these rights are of a character and would lead to consequences which make it absolutely certain that the African race were not included under the name of citizens of a state and were not in the contemplation of the framers of the Constitution when these privileges and immunities were provided for the protection of the citizen in other states.

No one, we presume, supposes that any change in public opinion or feeling in relation to this unfortunate race, in the civilized nations of Europe or in this country, should induce the Court to give to the words of the Constitution a more liberal construction in their favor than they were intended to bear when the instrument was framed and adopted.

Such an argument would be altogether inadmissible in any tribunal called on to interpret it. If any of its provisions are deemed unjust, there is a mode prescribed in the instrument itself by which it may be amended; but, while it remains unaltered, it must be construed now as it was understood at the time of its adoption.

It is not only the same in words but the same in meaning and delegates, the same powers to the government and reserves, and secures the same rights and privileges to the citizen; and, as long as it continues to exist in its present form, it speaks not only in the same words but with the same meaning and intent with which it spoke when it came from the hands of its framers and was voted on and adopted by the people of the United States.

Any other rule of construction would abrogate the judicial character of this Court and make it the mere reflex of the popular opinion or passion of the day. This Court was not created by the Constitution for such purposes. Higher and graver trusts have been confided to it and it must not falter in the path of duty.

What the construction was at that time, we think, can hardly admit of doubt. We have the language of the Declaration of Independence and of the Articles of Confederation, in addition to the plain words of the Constitution itself; we have the legislation of the different states before, about the time, and since the Constitution was adopted; we have the legislation of Congress, from the time of its adoption to a recent period; and we have the constant and uniform action of the Executive Department, all concurring together and leading to the same result.

And upon a full and careful consideration of the subject, the Court is of opinion that, upon the facts stated in the plea in abatement, Dred Scott was not a citizen of Missouri within the meaning of the Constitution of the United States and not entitled as such to sue in its courts, and, consequently, that the Circuit Court had no jurisdiction of the case and that the judgment on the plea in abatement is erroneous.

The case before us still more strongly imposes upon this Court the duty of examining whether the court below has not committed an error in taking jurisdiction and giving a judgment for costs in favor of the defendant; for, in Capron v. Van Noorden, the judgment was reversed because it did not appear that the parties were citizens of different states.

They might or might not be. But in this case it does appear that the plaintiff was born a slave; and if the facts upon which he relies have not made him free, then it appears affirmatively on the record that he is not a citizen, and consequently his suit against Sandford was not a suit between citizens of different states, and the court had no authority to pass any judgment between the parties.

The suit ought, in this view of it, to have been dismissed by the Circuit Court, and its judgment in favor of Sandford is erroneous and must be reversed. It is true that the result either way, by dismissal or by a judgment for the defendant, makes very little, if any, difference in a pecuniary or personal point of view to either party.

But the fact that the result would be very nearly the same to the parties in either form of judgment would not justify this Court in sanctioning an error in the judgment which is patent on the record, and which, if sanctioned, might be drawn into precedent and lead to serious mischief and injustice in some future suit.

We proceed. In considering this part of the controversy, two questions arise: And the difficulty which meets us at the threshold of this part of the inquiry is whether Congress was authorized to pass this law under any of the powers granted to it by the Constitution; for, if the authority is not given by that instrument, it is the duty of this Court to declare it void and inoperative and incapable of conferring freedom upon anyone who is held as a slave under the laws of any one of the states.

It was a special provision for a known and particular territory, and to meet a present emergency, and nothing more. This brings us to examine by what provision of the Constitution the present federal government, under its delegated and restricted powers, is authorized to acquire territory outside of the original limits of the United States, and what powers it may exercise therein over the person or property of a citizen of the United States while it remains a territory and until it shall be admitted as one of the states of the Union.

There is certainly no power given by the Constitution to the federal government to establish or maintain colonies bordering on the United States or at a distance, to be ruled and governed at its own pleasure; nor to enlarge its territorial limits in any way, except by the admission of new states.

That power is plainly given; and if a new state is admitted, it needs no further legislation by Congress, because the Constitution itself defines the relative rights and powers and duties of the state, and the citizens of the state, and the federal government. But no power is given to acquire a territory to be held and governed permanently in that character.

And indeed the power exercised by Congress to acquire territory and establish a government there, according to its own unlimited discretion, was viewed with great jealousy by the leading statesmen of the day. And in The Federalist No. Madison, he speaks of the acquisition of the Northwestern Territory by the confederated states, by the cession from Virginia, and the establishment of a government there, as an exercise of power not warranted by the Articles of Confederation and dangerous to the liberties of the people.

And he urges the adoption of the Constitution as a security and safeguard against such an exercise of power. We do not mean, however, to question the power of Congress in this respect. The power to expand the territory of the United States by the admission of new states is plainly given; and in the construction of this power by all the departments of the government, it has been held to authorize the acquisition of territory, not fit for admission at the time but to be admitted as soon as its population and situation would entitle it to admission.

It is acquired to become a state and not to be held as a colony and governed by Congress with absolute authority; and, as the propriety of admitting a new state is committed to the sound discretion of Congress, the power to acquire territory for that purpose, to be held by the United States until it is in a suitable condition to become a state upon an equal footing with the other states, must rest upon the same discretion.

It is a question for the political department of the government and not the judicial; and whatever the political department of the government shall recognize as within the limits of the United States, the judicial department is also bound to recognize and to administer in it the laws of the United States, so far as they apply, and to maintain in the territory the authority and rights of the government, and also the personal rights and rights of property of individual citizens as secured by the Constitution.

All we mean to say on this point is that, as there is no express regulation in the Constitution defining the power which the general government may exercise over the person or property of a citizen in a territory thus acquired, the Court must necessarily look to the provisions and principles of the Constitution and its distribution of powers for the rules and principles by which its decision must be governed.

Taking this rule to guide us, it may be safely assumed that citizens of the United States who migrate to a territory belonging to the people of the United States cannot be ruled as mere colonists, dependent upon the will of the general government, and to be governed by any laws it may think proper to impose. The principle upon which our governments rest, and upon which alone they continue to exist, is the union of states, sovereign and independent within their own limits in their internal and domestic concerns, and bound together as one people by a general government, possessing certain enumerated and restricted powers, delegated to it by the people of the several states, and exercising supreme authority within the scope of the powers granted to it, throughout the dominion of the United States.

A power, therefore, in the general government to obtain and hold colonies and dependent territories over which they might legislate, without restriction, would be inconsistent with its own existence in its present form. Whatever it acquires, it acquires for the benefit of the people of the several states who created it. It is their trustee acting for them and charged with the duty of promoting the interests of the whole people of the Union in the exercise of the powers specifically granted.

But the power of Congress over the person or property of a citizen can never be a mere discretionary power under our Constitution and form of government. The powers of the government and the rights and privileges of the citizen are regulated and plainly defined by the Constitution itself.

And, when the territory becomes a part of the United States, the federal government enters into possession in the character impressed upon it by those who created it. It enters upon it with its powers over the citizen strictly defined and limited by the Constitution, from which it derives its own existence and by virtue of which alone it continues to exist and act as a government and sovereignty.

It has no power of any kind beyond it; and it cannot, when it enters a territory of the United States, put off its character and assume discretionary or despotic powers which the Constitution has denied to it. It cannot create for itself a new character separated from the citizens of the United States and the duties it owes them under the provisions of the Constitution.

The territory being a part of the United States, the government and the citizen both enter it under the authority of the Constitution, with their respective rights defined and marked out; and the federal government can exercise no power over his person or property beyond what that instrument confers, nor lawfully deny any right which it has reserved.

A reference to a few of the provisions of the Constitution will illustrate this proposition. For example, no one, we presume, will contend that Congress can make any law in a territory respecting the establishment of religion, or the free exercise thereof, or abridging the freedom of speech or of the press, or the right of the people of the territory peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for the redress of grievances.

Nor can Congress deny to the people the right to keep and bear arms, nor the right to trial by jury, nor compel anyone to be a witness against himself in a criminal proceeding. These powers, and others, in relation to rights of person, which it is not necessary here to enumerate, are, in express and positive terms, denied to the general government; and the rights of private property have been guarded with equal care.

Thus the rights of property are united with the rights of person and placed on the same ground by the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution, which provides that no person shall be deprived of life, liberty, and property without due process of law. And an act of Congress which deprives a citizen of the United States of his liberty or property, merely because he came himself or brought his property into a particular territory of the United States, and who had committed no offense against the laws, could hardly be dignified with the name of due process of law.

So, too, it will hardly be contended that Congress could by law quarter a soldier in a house in a territory without the consent of the owner, in time of peace, nor in time of war, but in a manner prescribed by law. Nor could they by law forfeit the property of a citizen in a territory who was convicted of treason for a longer period than the life of the person convicted; nor take private property for public use without just compensation.

The powers over person and property of which we speak are not only not granted to Congress but are in express terms denied, and they are forbidden to exercise them. And this prohibition is not confined to the states, but the words are general and extend to the whole territory over which the Constitution gives it power to legislate, including those portions of it remaining under territorial government as well as that covered by states.

It is a total absence of power everywhere within the dominion of the United States and places the citizens of a territory, so far as these rights are concerned, on the same footing with citizens of the states and guards them as firmly and plainly against any inroads which the general government might attempt under the plea of implied or incidental powers.

And if Congress itself cannot do this—if it is beyond the powers conferred on the federal government—it will be admitted, we presume, that it could not authorize a territorial government to exercise them. It could confer no power on any local government established by its authority to violate the provisions of the Constitution. It seems, however, to be supposed that there is a difference between property in a slave and other property and that different rules may be applied to it in expounding the Constitution of the United States.

And the laws and usages of nations and the writings of eminent jurists upon the relation of master and slave and their mutual rights and duties, and the powers which governments may exercise over it, have been dwelt upon in the argument. But, in considering the question before us, it must be borne in mind that there is no law of nations standing between the people of the United States and their government and interfering with their relation to each other.

The powers of the government and the rights of the citizen under it are positive and practical regulations plainly written down. The people of the United States have delegated to it certain enumerated powers and forbidden it to exercise others. It has no power over the person or property of a citizen but what the citizens of the United States have granted.

And no laws or usages of other nations, or reasoning of statesmen or jurists upon the relations of master and slave, can enlarge the powers of the government or take from the citizens the rights they have reserved. And if the Constitution recognizes the right of property of the master in a slave, and makes no distinction between that description of property and other property owned by a citizen, no tribunal, acting under the authority of the United States, whether it be legislative, executive, or judicial, has a right to draw such a distinction or deny to it the benefit of the provisions and guarantees which have been provided for the protection of private property against the encroachments of the government.

Now, as we have already said in an earlier part of this opinion, upon a different point, the right of property in a slave is distinctly and expressly affirmed in the Constitution. The right to traffic in it, like an ordinary article of merchandise and property, was guaranteed to the citizens of the United States, in every state that might desire it, for twenty years.

And the government in express terms is pledged to protect it in all future time if the slave escapes from his owner. This is done in plain words—too plain to be misunderstood. And no word can be found in the Constitution which gives Congress a greater power over slave property or which entitles property of that kind to less protection than property of any other description.

The only power conferred is the power coupled with the duty of guarding and protecting the owner in his rights. Upon these considerations it is the opinion of the Court that the act of Congress which prohibited a citizen from holding and owning property of this kind in the territory of the United States north of the line therein mentioned is not warranted by the Constitution and is therefore void; and that neither Dred Scott himself, nor any of his family, were made free by being carried into this territory; even if they had been carried there by the owner with the intention of becoming a permanent resident.

We have so far examined the case as it stands under the Constitution of the United States and the powers thereby delegated to the federal government. But there is another point in the case which depends on state power and state law. And it is contended, on the part of the plaintiff, that he is made free by being taken to Rock Island, in the state of Illinois, independently of his residence in the territory of the United States; and, being so made free, he was not again reduced to a state of slavery by being brought back to Missouri.

Our notice of this part of the case will be very brief, for the principle on which it depends was decided in this Court, upon much consideration, in the case of Strader et al. In that case, the slaves had been taken from Kentucky to Ohio, with the consent of the owner, and afterward brought back to Kentucky. And this Court held that their status or condition, as free or slave, depended upon the laws of Kentucky, when they were brought back into that state, and not of Ohio; and that this Court had no jurisdiction to revise the judgment of a state court upon its own laws.

This was the point directly before the Court, and the decision that this Court had not jurisdiction turned upon it, as will be seen by the report of the case. So in this case. As Scott was a slave when taken into the state of Illinois by his owner, and was there held as such, and brought back in that character, his status, as free or slave, depended on the laws of Missouri and not of Illinois.

It has, however, been urged in the argument, that by the laws of Missouri he was free on his return, and that this case, therefore, cannot be governed by the case of Strader et al. Graham, where it appeared, by the laws of Kentucky, that the plaintiffs continued to be slaves on their return from Ohio.

But whatever doubts or opinions may, at one time, have been entertained upon this subject, we are satisfied, upon a careful examination of all the cases decided in the state courts of Missouri referred to, that it is now firmly settled by the decisions of the highest court in the state that Scott and his family, upon their return, were not free, but were, by the laws of Missouri, the property of the defendant; and that the Circuit Court of the United States had no jurisdiction when by the laws of the state, the plaintiff was a slave and not a citizen.

Washington delivered a speech at the Cotton States and International Exposition in Atlanta, Georgia, that made him a national figure. Washington emphasized that African Americans wanted responsibilities rather than rights and proposed a program of accommodation that pleased white Southerners.

The result was that Washington assumed the role of spokesperson for African Americans. Washington inherited this role from Frederick Douglass, who had died earlier in the year. One-third of the population of the South is of the Negro race. No enterprise seeking the material, civil, or moral welfare of this section can disregard this element of our population and reach the highest success.

I but convey to you, Mr. President and Directors, the sentiment of the masses of my race when I say that in no way have the value and manhood of the American Negro been more fittingly and generously recognized than by the managers of this magnificent exposition at every stage of its progress. It is a recognition that will do more to cement the friendship of the two races than any occurrence since the dawn of our freedom.

Not only this, but the opportunity here afforded will awaken among us a new era of industrial progress. Ignorant and inexperienced, it is not strange that in the first years of our new life we began at the top instead of at the bottom; that a seat in Congress or the state legislature was more sought than real estate or industrial skill; that the political convention or stump speaking had more attractions than starting a dairy farm or truck garden.

A ship lost at sea for many days suddenly sighted a friendly vessel. From the mast of the unfortunate vessel was seen a signal: To those of my race who depend on bettering their condition in a foreign land or who underestimate the importance of cultivating friendly relations with the Southern white man, who is their next-door neighbor, I would say: Cast down your bucket where you are; cast it down in making friends, in every manly way, of the people of all races by whom we are surrounded.

Cast it down in agriculture, mechanics, in commerce, in domestic service, and in the professions. And in this connection it is well to bear in mind that whatever other sins the South may be called to bear, when it comes to business, pure and simple, it is in the South that the Negro is given a man"s chance in the commercial world, and in nothing is this exposition more eloquent than in emphasizing this chance.

Our greatest danger is that, in the great leap from slavery to freedom, we may overlook the fact that the masses of us are to live by the productions of our hands and fail to keep in mind that we shall prosper in proportion as we learn to dignify and glorify common labor, and put brains and skill into the common occupations of life; shall prosper in proportion as we learn to draw the line between the superficial and the substantial, the ornamental gewgaws of life and the useful.

No race can prosper till it learns that there is as much dignity in tilling a field as in writing a poem. It is at the bottom of life we must begin, and not at the top. Nor should we permit our grievances to overshadow our opportunities. Cast down your bucket among these people who have, without strikes and labor wars, tilled your fields, cleared your forests, builded your railroads and cities, and brought forth treasures from the bowels of the earth and helped make possible this magnificent representation of the progress of the South.

Casting down your bucket among my people, helping and encouraging them as you are doing on these grounds, and, with education of head, hand, and heart, you will find that they will buy your surplus land, make blossom the waste places in your fields, and run your factories. While doing this, you can be sure in the future, as in the past, that you and your families will be surrounded by the most patient, faithful, law-abiding, and unresentful people that the world has seen.

As we have proved our loyalty to you in the past, in nursing your children, watching by the sickbed of your mothers and fathers, and often following them with tear-dimmed eyes to their graves, so in the future, in our humble way, we shall stand by you with a devotion that no foreigner can approach, ready to lay down our lives, if need be, in defense of yours; interlacing our industrial, commercial, civil, and religious life with yours in a way that shall make the interests of both races one.

In all things that are purely social we can be as separate as the fingers, yet one as the hand in all things essential to mutual progress. There is no defense or security for any of us except in the highest intelligence and development of all. If anywhere there are efforts tending to curtail the fullest growth of the Negro, let these efforts be turned into stimulating, encouraging, and making him the most useful and intelligent citizen.

Effort or means so invested will pay a thousand percent interest. The laws of changeless justice bind Oppressor with oppressed; And close as sin and suffering joined We march to fate abreast. Nearly 16 million hands will aid you in pulling the load upward, or they will pull against you the load downward. We shall constitute one-third and more of the ignorance and crime of the South, or one-third its intelligence and progress; we shall contribute one-third to the business and industrial prosperity of the South, or we shall prove a veritable body of death, stagnating, depressing, retarding every effort to advance the body politic.

Gentlemen of the exposition, as we present to you our humble effort at an exhibition of our progress, you must not expect overmuch. Starting thirty years ago with ownership here and there in a few quilts and pumpkins and chickens gathered from miscellaneous sources , remember: While we take pride in what we exhibit as a result of our independent efforts, we do not for a moment forget that our part in this exhibition would fall far short of your expectations but for the constant help that has come to our educational life, not only from the Southern states but especially from Northern philanthropists who have made their gifts a constant stream of blessing and encouragement.

The wisest among my race understand that the agitation of questions of social equality is the extremest folly, and that progress in the enjoyment of all the privileges that will come to us must be the result of severe and constant struggle rather than of artificial forcing. No race that has anything to contribute to the markets of the world is long in any degree ostracized.

It is important and right that all privileges of the law be ours, but it is vastly more important that we be prepared for the exercise of those privileges. The opportunity to earn a dollar in a factory just now is worth infinitely more than the opportunity to spend a dollar in an opera house.

This, coupled with our material prosperity, will bring into our beloved South a new heaven and a new earth. As the party of President Abraham Lincoln, signer of the Emancipation Proclamation, Republicans naturally appealed to black voters. In , however, President Franklin D. Roosevelt became the first Democrat to win a majority of the black vote.

Democrats have maintained the allegiance of African American voters in every election since then. Indeed, by the s, Democrats routinely received 90 percent of the black vote in presidential elections. Bill Clinton aggressively courted African American voters when he ran for president on the Democratic Party ticket in In particular, Clinton struck an alliance with the Reverend Jesse Jackson, the most influential black Democrat in the country.

Jackson first came to national prominence in the s when he worked as an aide to civil rights leader Martin Luther King, Jr. After founding the Rainbow Coalition, a civil rights lobbying organization, Jackson ran for the Democratic presidential nomination in In the strongest showing ever by an African American candidate, Jackson won several million votes before being defeated by Walter Mondale in the primary.

Jackson"s influence in the Democratic Party grew even stronger in subsequent years. At the Democratic National Convention in July , Jackson"s address, printed here, electrified the delegates. Chairman Ron Brown, you"ve done a difficult job well. You have brought down barriers. Your work makes us proud. President Bill Clinton, you have survived a tough spring. It will make you stronger for the fall.

With your stripes you must heal and make us better. The hopes of many depend upon your quest. Be comforted that you do not stand alone. Vice President Al Gore comes to this task tested and prepared. He has been a reasoned voice for environmental sanity, a supporter of social justice, an original sponsor of DC statehood.

And I, for one, look forward to the vice-presidential debate. We stand as witnesses to a pregnant moment in history. Across the globe, we feel the pain that comes with new birth. Here, in our country pain abounds. We must be certain that it too leads to new birth, and not a tragic miscarriage of opportunity.

The great temptation in these difficult days of racial polarization and economic injustice is to make political arguments black and white, and miss the moral imperative of wrong and right. Vanity asks--is it popular? Politics asks--will it win? Morality and conscience ask--is it right?

We are part of a continuing struggle for justice and decency, links in a chain that began long before we were born and will extend long after we are gone. History will remember us not for our positioning, but for our principles. Not by our move to the political center, left or right, but rather by our grasp on the moral and ethical center of wrong and right.

We who stand with working people and poor have a special burden. We must stand for what is right, stand up to those who have the might. We do so grounded in the faith, that what is morally wrong will never be politically right. But if it is morally sound, it will eventually be politically right.

When I look at you gathered here today, I hear the pain and see the struggles that prepared the ground that you stand on. We have come a long way from where we started. A generation ago--in , Fanny Lou Hamer had to fight even to sit in this convention. We are more interdependent than we realize.

Not only African Americans benefitted from the movement for justice. It was only when African Americans were free to win and sit in these seats, that Bill Clinton and Al Gore from the new South could be able to stand on this rostrum. We are inextricably bound together in a single garment of destiny. Red, yellow, brown, black and white, we are all precious in God"s sight.

Tonight we face another challenge. Ten million Americans are unemployed, 25 million on food stamps, 35 million in poverty, 40 million have no health care. From the coal miners in Bigstone Gap, West Virginia to the loggers and environmentalists in Roseburg, Oregon, from displaced textile workers in my home town of Greenville, South Carolina to plants closing in Van Nuys, California, pain abounds.

Plants are closing, jobs leaving on a fast track, more are working for less, trapped by repressive anti-labor laws. The homeless are a source of national shame and disgrace. There is a harshness to America that comes from not seeing and a growing mindless materialism. Our television sets bring the world into our living rooms, but too often we overlook our neighbors.

We have a president who has traveled the world, but has never been to Hamlet, North Carolina. Yet we must not overlook Hamlet. It was there that 25 workers died in a fire at Imperial Foods, more women than men, more white than black. They worked making chicken parts in vats heated to degrees, with few windows and no fans. The owners locked the doors on the outside. The workers died trapped by economic desperation and oppressive work laws.

I don"t want to go on welfare. I have three children and no husband. We pluck 90 wings a minute. Now I can"t bend my wrist, I got the carpel thing. Then when we"re hurt they fire us, and we have no health insurance, and no union to help us. We can"t get another job because we"re crippled, so they put us on welfare and call us lazy.

We stand in two inches of water with two five-minute bathroom breaks. Sometimes we can"t hold our water, and then our bowels, and we faint. If we keep Hamlet in our hearts and before our eyes, we will act to empower working people. We will protect the right to organize and to strike. We will empower workers to enforce health and safety laws.

We will provide a national health care system, a minimum wage sufficient to bring workers out of poverty, paid parental leave. We must build a movement for economic justice across the land. We face a difficult challenge. That's It reminds me that Warren Buffet converted his warrants to stock on the same day Jay dropped 4: Prosperity timeline.

Last edited: Oct 3, Thanks x 5. Thanks x 2 LOL! Thanks x 1 Hugs! Thanks x 1. Thanks x 3 Hugs! Thanks x 7 Hugs! Thanks x 6 LOL! Thanks x 4. Thanks x Thanks x 7 LOL! Thanks x 8. Thanks x 4 Skeptical x 1. Nor are you fully in your fifth dimensional body. This is not because you did something wrong, but because you are a prototype.

A prototype is defined as: To complete your process, you will be called on to release your third and fourth dimensional manner of thinking before your fifth dimensional brain is fully online. For this NOW, we suggest that you focus primarily on the third dimension as your baseline and the fifth dimension as where YOU go, but do not live yet. Some people may be afraid of your changes and will judge you because they are frightened.

Hence, it is best to focus on the third dimension as your baseline. More about states of consciousness at: What is Multidimensional Consciousness? Suzanne Lie and the Arcturians on Multidimensions. You may wish to experience this reality, but you can only do so when your emotions resonate with your High Heart, your thinking resonates with your Multidimensional Mind, and your High Heart and Multidimensional Mind are calibrated to each other.

The Unconditional Love of your High Heart is not just an emotion. Unconditional love is a frequency of resonance in which unity and trust are natural and constant. This resonance is of the fifth dimensional frequency and beyond. In the same manner, multidimensional thinking can best occur when your High Heart and Multidimensional Mind are connected. Multidimensional Thinking resonates to the frequency of Unconditional love, and both sensations are fifth dimensional.

These feelings and sensations come in waves, which allow you to experience and gradually adapt to each wave of this energy. An energy- wave of these sensations is much like dipping your body into very cold, or very hot, water.

Unlike a More physically fit. I don"t want to go on welfare. Across the globe, we feel the pain that comes with new birth.

African American history at a glance:

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  2. But if he ranks as a citizen in the state to which he belongs, within the meaning of the Constitution of the United States, then, whenever he goes into another state, the Constitution clothes him, as to the rights of person, with all the privileges and immunities which belong to citizens of the state.
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South Africa remains a terrorist state. It is at the bottom of life we must begin, and not at the top. Prototypes of the MIT Seaswarm robots have been tested in the ocean, but they're not ready for commercial use. Tiny scales could serve as safe material in implants to reinforce bones and joints Posted:


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